CURRENT RESEARCH PROJECTS

2017 RESEARCH REPORTS


IDENTIFYING THE RISK OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING AT DIFFERENT LEVELS OF THE NAMIBIA FISHING SECTOR AND BEST PRACTICES FOR COMBATING RISK

Summary: This project investigated human trafficking and forced labour within the Namibian fishing industry. The study was conceived with the aim of identifying possible human rights abuses at sea and the risks arising from it. The key findings revealed that while human trafficking is not a major threat in the Namibian Fishing Industry, especially at sea, the high levels of desperation for employment could lead the work force into undesirable situations of illegal fishing, trafficking and exploitation. One incident in 2010 reports the plight of four (4) Namibian Fishermen that boarded a foreign vessel after having signed contracts drafted in a foreign language not known to them and without any representation. These victims were dumped in Uruguay and for 2 years their whereabouts were unknown. Although they eventually made it back home, they had endured a great deal of hardship during this time. (Attached pdf document)


ORGANISATIONAL REVIEW OF TRADE UNION FEDERATIONS IN NAMIBIA: NUNW, TUCNA AND NANLO

Summary: This study was an organisational assessment review on Trade Unions in Namibia. The study gives a broad overview of the state of trade union federations in Namibia, size and impact, number of sectoral unions, total number of affiliates per federation. As well as an assessment of strengths and weakness; organisational governance: constitutions, general regulations and policies and procedures in place for effective functioning of the organisations. The study also conducted an analysis of organisational internal human and financial capacities, and accountability mechanisms. As well as service delivery and benefits provision to members, education and training and research activities, level of engagement in policy dialogue, include engagement in NDWCP implementation. Lastly, the study looked at national policy influence including campaigns and action held over the last 5 years. (Attached pdf document)


COMPREHENSIVE GENDER STUDY: GENDER RELATED CONDITIONS, NEEDS AND CHALLENGES IN TRANSPORT IN NAMIBIA

Summary: A comprehensive and holistic analysis of the transport sector on gender, taking into consideration HIV/AIDS as well as the Inclusion of people with disabilities, following the core question: How does Gender depict with regards to Transport in Namibia? The objective is to provide a representative perspective on gender issues in the transport sector in Namibia and to develop a sound data basis for future monitoring of integrated implementation of measures conducted by MWT or related sector key state actors. (Attached pdf document)



2016 RESEARCH REPORTS


AN ANALYTICAL REPORT OF NAMIBIA ON INFORMALITY AND INEQUALITY FOR UN ECONOMIC COMMISSION FOR AFRICA

Summary: The report examines linkages between inequality and informality in Namibia. Specifically, it analyses drivers of youth employment with emphasis on informal sector and explore contribution of such sector employment to socio economic inequality respectively. While informality as a practice is prevalent in various spheres of Namibia’ social and economic life, little research or analysis has been done about the subject especially in the employment sector. This report is special as it is exploratory in nature. (Attached pdf document)


WORKING CONDITIONS OF THE POLICE AND PRISON OFFICERS: A NAMIBIAN CASE STUDY

Summary: The study investigated the working conditions of the Police and Prison Officers in Namibia. The main purpose of the study was to uncover the working conditions of employees in the Namibian security cluster and make recommendations to concerned authorities for endorsement and further action. Amongst other factors, the study found that the Police and Prison officials working conditions are largely characterized by the following: Disparities on salaries; this is in relation to work load vs salaries received Poor benefits e.g. Housing allowance extremely inadequate; Lack of adequate resources for efficient execution of duties; Poor training; Lack of proper or clear channels for grievances resolution; Inconsistencies/non-implementation of policies e.g. promotion policies; Legal prohibition for the establishment of trade unions for the police and prison officers; (Attached pdf document)


NAMIBIA INFORMAL ECONOMY SECTOR CASE STUDY

Summary: The informal economy is a major source of employment and livelihoods in many countries and interacts closely with the formal economy. Estimates of the size, contribution, and composition of the informal sector vary widely within regions and across countries in the world. Therefore this study investigated the nature and extent of informal economy in Namibia with the aim of informing policy strategies and interventions. Furthermore the findings provided policy direction on facilitating the transitioning of the informal economy to the formal economy, in line with Recommendation 2014. The Informal Sector Survey (ISS) was conducted in eight regions in Namibia during 2016 (/Karas, Omaheke, Khomas, Erongo, Oshana, Ohangwena, Kavango East and Zambezi). The main objective of the survey was to characterize the informal sector with regards to the activities of enterprises, and to provide a snapshot of the legal environment within which social protection can be extended to the informal sector. The key selected findings from the study were: Most of own-account workers are in urban areas with coverage of high as 76.8 percent, nevertheless regional variations were evident. Predominantly the own-account workers are young-adult female who have completed junior secondary education. Close to 85 percent had access to cell-phones. None have received any training in running a business (70 percent); however others have received training such as crafts, repair and operations of machinery (8.5 percent). This suggests either lack of training in operating business might impact sustainability of their businesses. The majority of businesses were sole-ownership (92.1 percent) and about 7 percent are in partnerships. Most of these enterprises were relatively new having been established in the last 5 years preceding the survey date. Notable was that about 12 percent of operators have been operating for less than 6 months. Results also show that over half of the businesses were in wholesale and retail trade, with slightly equal distribution in urban and rural areas. (Attached pdf document)


NAMIBIA NATIONAL EMPLOYMENT REPORT

Summary: This project resulted in a national employment report for Namibia presented to the SADC secretariat. It provided a descriptive analysis of core set of statistical decent work indicators in Namibia. The main objectives were: To produce a set of tables on the SADC minimum list of decent work indicators. To analyse the data disaggregated by gender and where possible by vulnerable groups. The set of indicators is guided by the SADC minimum list, which can be summarized into 8 broad categories: the demographic characteristics of the population; labour force; youth unemployment; the skills mismatch; conditions and the quality of employment; social protection; social dialogue and disability in total employment. In general, the report covers indicators to monitor MGD 1.B relating to the full, productive and decent employment especially for the youth and women. In total, 26 labour indicators were analysed and presented. (Attached pdf document)



2017 RESEARCH REPORTS


BASIC NEEDS BASKET

Summary: The Basic Needs Basket (BNB) pilot study investigated the incidence of poverty among low income communities in Windhoek (Okahandja Park, Katutura Central, Shandumbala and Wanaheda) using the Basic Needs Basket (BNB) approach. In total, 20 households were selected using the random sampling methodology. Five (5) households were selected from each location to improve representativeness of the sample. BNB approach looks at cost of living among low income households by computing a basket of food and non-food essentials that ought to be consumed by a household and the related costs of the items. Therefore, all households which cannot afford to buy the items contained in the basket would be considered as poor. The study revealed that households which participated in the study have a combined average household income of N$4649.00 per month. Noticeable income disparities among the households and locations were observed. For instance, the household with the highest income earned 21 times more than the household with the lowest income. Moreover, households in Katutura central and Shandumbala have higher incomes than households in Wanaheda and Okahandja Park. (Attached pdf document)